Amanda Stanhaus

Tag: mutual fund

Actively Managed Fund

A unique group of stocks and/or bonds that are picked by a money manager with a goal of buying low and selling high.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Asset Allocation Fund

fund in which a manager mixes stockbonds, and cash according to the fund’s objectives.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Back-end load

The service fee charged upon the sale of a mutual fund share. The fee amount decreases as the time of share ownership increases.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Bond Fund

mutual fund that is made up of bonds.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Closed-end Mutual Fund

mutual fund with a fixed amount of units, therefore always representing the same percentage of the fund. Shares can be bought and sold, without touching the securities that make up the fund.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

 

Dividend

A company or mutual fund’s pocket change that it throws at shareholders every few months. A slice of the returns! Common, but not mandatory.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Dividend Reinvestment Plan

dividend  is used to buy more shares of the corresponding company or mutual fund.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Emergency Fund

[Flashing lights.] “Must spend money.” This is used up quickly when in a pickle. $$ must be saved in advance.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Equity Fund

Equity=stock Therefore, a mutual fund that invests in stocks.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)

Exchange Traded Fund

ETF. A mutual fund, but trades like a stock. Pluses include the diversification of a mutual fund and the convenience of stock.

(Originally published on Amanda Stanhaus’s financial literacy vocab blog: XO, Bettie Vocab.)